How to Teach Kids and Friends to Fishing!

Fishing Fun for Everyone!

Teaching kids to fish is fun! It’s very very easy to teach kids how to fish, and in this lens, I’ll guide you how to do it. It’s easy and fun. You already have all of the key ingredients for fun with kids built into this activity.

Kids love action and contrary to popular belief, fishing has all sorts of action. Kids love to learn new things and be outdoors, and I’ll show you some great ways to get them to have success quickly. Most importantly, kids love the one on one time and getting them outdoors, away from all those electronic gadgets with something in their hands besides a gameboy is just the way to do it!

Learning how to fish is a great fun family activity and also a bonding experience with friends. Just ask a friend if they’d like to try something new and have some fun outdoors! (I took all pictures with this lens, all rights reserved)

Start Out With the Right Tools for the Job.

The beauty of fishing is that there isn’t much needed to have a real time and the basics can be bought fairly cheaply. I’ll show you some of my choices below that are great to start beginners out with!

Break out the shovel
Let the hunt begin!

Take your new fishing partner outside with a shovel and find some soft ground to dig for worms in. Of course, don’t dig under Grandma’s prized rose bushes, but if I have to tell you that, maybe you shouldn’t be taking your fishing partner outside unsupervised!

There are many places to find worms without digging too, like under rocks and things that have been sitting outside for a long time. After a big rain in the summer is also a great time to go worm hunting.

Sometimes my young fishing partners like the worm hunting more than the actual fishing, so are ready! If you can’t find worms in your neck of the woods, then you can always buy some.

Nothing to it, but to do it!

As a rule of thumb, I don’t take anyone new to fishing out unless it’s a beautiful day. Most everyone likes to be outside when it’s sunny and warm, so that starts the fishing experience out on the right foot.

If you are not very experienced yourself, it helps to talk to someone local who is in the know about where the fish are biting too. Now that you have the tools for fun, take your new fishing partner out to your local lake, stream, or pond and get them ready to go!
Bait up and blast off!
The bobber boogie.

Fishing with KidsPeople new to fishing love the visceral experience of watching a bobber disappear, so I like to put a worm on the hook for them (they can learn how to themselves later) and put a bobber on the line. Teach them the simple over the shoulder casting method and then watch that bobber bob.

This is the right time to talk about what a beautiful day it is, or what has been going on in their lives that they’d like to chat about.. It’s perfect for visiting with young people, because there aren’t any of the usual distractions. I’ve had some of my most meaningful conversations with kids out fishing, since it’s quiet and active all at the same time. It’s all about the quality time.
Do a Little Fishing Off the Ebay.

Fish On.
Hog him in!

Kids love fishing!When that bobber disappears show your new fishing pal how to pull back the pole to set the hook and then sit back and watch them reel it in! My boy likes to call it hogging them in, but he’s a bit colorful, so call it what you like.

When the fish gets close to the edge of the water, help them bring it the rest of the way onto shore for a great first catch photo pic! Maybe sometime I’ll write a lens about how to clean a fish, but for your fishing friend’s first time, I suggest catch and release.

Believe me they will be all smiles and before the day is done they will be asking when they can come out with you and do it all over again. If you don’t catch anything, don’t worry, just say “that’s why they call it going fishing and not going catching” :). Remember it’s all quality time.

Safety First!

I decided that it’s a good idea to have people that are newer to fishing wear safety glasses. This keeps them safe from yanking back hard trying to set the hook and hooking themselves in the eye instead. Don’t worry, I never heard about it, but you can never be too careful!

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